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Tale of the Wheel

Apr 28th, 2014 | By | Category: Features, Front Page

      Originally from the Elizabethtown Chronicle You have probably seen old pictures of bicycles with huge front wheels and small back wheels.  The riders in the faded pictures were seated five feet off the ground on a seat mounted just behind the center point of the front wheel.  The “wheels,” as these early bicycles were known, were the first self-powered machines used for overland transportation. You never see these wheels being ridden, except by trained professionals, because they were outlawed in 1890.  It was easy for the rider to get his weight too far forward causing him to fly[Read more...]



1950 House Inspired by “Mr. Blandings”

Apr 8th, 2014 | By | Category: Features, Lead Article, Uncategorized

    Dr. Luther Werner Fetter, an Elizabethtown dentist, and Mary, his wife, were vaguely considering building a house outside town in 1948.  After they went to the Moose Theater to see the RKO movie “Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House,” they knew what they wanted.  They were smitten with the New England-style house and its floor-plan that the Blandings had built.        In the film, Jim Blandings (Cary Grant) and his wife, Muriel (Myrna Loy), decided to build a comfortable house in the Connecticut countryside for themselves and their two daughters.  They were too crowded in their Manhattan apartment.  They[Read more...]



Etown’s First Railroad

Feb 11th, 2014 | By | Category: Features, Front Page

This article originally appeared in the Elizabethtown Chronicle in 2006.  It is part of a series by Pat and Lloyd Reed. Elizabethtown became a borough in 1827, the same year that the state legislature appropriated money for a railroad from Philadelphia to Columbia. The state legislature had also authorized a canal be built along the Susquehanna and Juniata Rivers from Hollidaysburg to Columbia. The businessmen of Elizabethtown, Middletown and Mt. Joy feared traffic on the main road from Lancaster to Harrisburg, which ran through their towns, would diminish when people started using the canals and railroad. They decided to build[Read more...]



German farmers opposed first school

Dec 1st, 2013 | By | Category: Features, Front Page

This feature is part of a series of articles chronicling Elizabethtown history and written by Pat and Lloyd Reed.  The pieces originally appeared in the Elizabethtown Chronicle. Before 1834, children were not required to go to school.  If a child’s parents had money to spend on “book learning”, the child went to school.  If not, the child stayed home.  Between 1802 and 1809 Pauper Education Acts were passed to provide poor children with an education, but the children and parents felt disgraced to be labeled paupers and did not take advantage of them.  Finally, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court decided that[Read more...]



Remembering Tony’s

Jul 12th, 2013 | By | Category: Features, Lead Article

    Another in the series of articles about Elizabethtown’s history by Pat and Lloyd Reed.  The essays originally apperaed in the Chronicle.   Bev Ulrich and her husband, Skip, purchased the building on South Market Street that had once housed Tony’s Restaurant.  The restaurant had been a hang out for teenagers in the 1950s because it featured a jukebox, pinball machines and soda fountain with a counter.  Root beer floats and Pat Boone, how cool was that!     As a surprise gift to Skip, Bev had Wayne Fettro paint a mural on the front of the building.  The lower section[Read more...]



World War II nearly claimed area farms

Jun 20th, 2013 | By | Category: Features, Front Page, Lead Article

    Another in the series of historical profiles by Pat and Lloyd Reed. These stories originally appeared in the Elizabethtown Chronicle. On December 8, 1941, the United States declared war on Japan and on December 11, it declared war on Germany and Italy.  By January 1942, the owners of 186 farms south and east of Elizabethtown were told that the U.S. government was contemplating purchasing their land for a T.N.T. production center needed for the war effort.       Residents of Elizabethtown recalled the sudden appearance of several representatives of the U.S. Army in the vicinity two weeks after Pearl Harbor[Read more...]



Horsecars

Jun 3rd, 2013 | By | Category: Features, Lead Article

This is the third in a series of articles describing the life and history of Elizabethtown.  The articles are authored by Pat (Patsy) and Lloyd Reed of the Elizabethtown Historical Society.  Most of these articles were originally written years ago for the Elizabethtown Chronicle.  Several of Patsy and Lloyd’s articles appeared in the Elizabethtown Journal in 2009 and 2010.  To view these articles click on the Reed’s name in the contributors box on the lower ride side of the page. Even before the first steam-powered train arrived in Elizabethtown in 1836, another revolution in mass transportation was being experimented with[Read more...]



Winter storm hampers man’s commute in 1903

May 21st, 2013 | By | Category: Features, Front Page

This is the second in a series of articles describing the life and history of Elizabethtown.  The articles are authored by Pat (Patsy) and Lloyd Reed of the Elizabethtown Historical Society.  Most of these articles were originally written years ago for the Elizabethtown Chronicle.  Several of Patsy and Lloyd’s articles appeared in the Elizabethtown Journal in 2009 and 2010.  To view these articles click on the Reed’s name in the contributors box on the lower ride side of the page.       In 1903, a blizzard-like snowstorm prevented Clarence Seibert from reporting to his coveted new job as a U.S. Railway[Read more...]



The life of a pinboy

May 13th, 2013 | By | Category: Features, Lead Article

This is the first in a series of articles describing the life and history of Elizabethtown.  The articles are authored by Pat (Patsy) and Lloyd Reed of the Elizabethtown Historical Society.  Most of these articles were originally written years ago for the Elizabethtown Chronicle.  Several of Patsy and Lloyd’s articles appeared in the Elizabethtown Journal in 2009 and 2010.  To view these articles click on the Reed’s name in the contributors box on the lower ride side of the page. In 1937, it cost 15 cents to bowl one game at the Central Bowling Alley located behind the Central House[Read more...]



Donegal Township Was Settled During the Reign of George I

Apr 7th, 2010 | By | Category: Lead Article

The King of England, George I, did not speak English. The German Elector of Hanover had become the English king through a series of unlikely circumstances and cared little about England and less about the American colonies.

When the first settlers moved into the Donegal area of Penn’s Woods, they were not bothered by English government officials. English oversight of the colony was perfunctory mainly involving paper work. William Penn, the proprietor,